matthew-seligmanMatthew Seligman, called to the UK bar in 1994 after a career in music that included playing bass with David Bowie at Live Aid in 1985, is returning to London in July 2017 to resume his human rights practice with Campbell Taylor Solicitors. After 10 years as a tenant specialising in personal injury at 39 Essex Street in London (cases included the Marchioness/ Bowbelle Formal Investigation, 2000-1), Matthew moved to Japan with his family in 2005, but retained his tenancy. A return to London in 2008 saw him make a switch, and he developed a human rights practice as in-house counsel first with Steel & Shamash and then Scott Moncrieff & Associates. Matthew was involved with some important decisions in the mental health field during this period (TTM v. LB Hackney [2011] HRLR 14, 1 WLR 2873, R(Sassay) v. SLAM [2011] All ER(D) 159).  Matthew made a sudden return from London to his family in Sendai following the earthquake and tsunami in March 2011 (see A journey into the danger zone). He remained in Sendai until this summer. Now Matthew is returning once again to London and human rights. Matthew will be based in Campbell Taylor’s London offices in Dalston and North Kensington, scene of the recent tower block fire tragedy, where he will specialise in human rights, mental health, and also the firm’s Court of Protection work.

DFDL has appointed Audray Souche as the managing director of its Thailand practice, succeeding Angus Mitchell in the role. Souche has been working in the region since 2002 and has more than six years of experience in the Thai jurisdiction, including five years as deputy managing director of DFDL in Thailand. As deputy head of the regional energy, mining and infrastructure practice group, she has led teams on numerous energy, project development, financing and technical assistance matters in Laos, Cambodia, Myanmar, Thailand, Vietnam, Bhutan and Nepal, and launched the development of a dedicated regional renewable energy division.

Latest Moves
Latest Articles
New regulation on the prohibition of sales of alcoholic beverages online
In line with evolving trends in technology, certain entrepreneurs and retailers have started using online channels to sell alcoholic beverages, which makes it difficult to ensure the sale of such beverages is in accordance with existing laws ...